Feb 09

Can Goldfish Really Drive?


Webinar

This event has passed.
Presentations
BGU’s goldfish are making a splash with a viral video that has made headlines, from USA Today and CNN, to The Late Night Show with Stephen Colbert and many more. Meet the researchers behind the miraculous driving fish and learn how these tiny creatures drove BGU to a major discovery!
Featuring:
Prof. Ohad Ben-Shahar
Shachar Givon
Matan Samina
Prof. Ronen Segev
Moderated by:
Doug Seserman
Americans for Ben-Gurion University CEO
Date
This event has passed.
Wednesday, February 09, 2022

12:00 p.m. - 12:45 p.m.
RSVP

You can join the Zoom webinar by any electronic device or by telephone. Details are provided upon registration.

Click here to register

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Prof. Ohad Ben-Shahar is a professor of Computer Science, head of the School of Brain Sciences and Cognition, former chair of the Department of Computer Science and the founding director of the Interdisciplinary Computational Vision Laboratory. While Prof. Ben-Shahar focuses on computational visions, his interests span across all aspects of theoretical, experimental, and applied vision sciences and their relationship to cognitive science as a whole.

 

 

 

Shachar Givon is currently a Ph.D. candidate at Ben-Gurion University (BGU) in the Department of Life Sciences, where she studies fish navigation in natural environments, where she participated in the team which conducted the experiment showing that goldfish can operate a vehicle. She received her B.Sc. in physics and M.Sc. in life science from BGU.

 

 

 

Prof. Ronen Segev is a professor of Life Sciences and the former head of the School of Brain Science at Ben-Gurion University (BGU). Prof. Segev’s research focuses on information processing in the brain, specifically pertaining to two important systems: vision and spatial cognition. Previously, he focused on fish neurobiology, the rationale being that the benefit of studying organisms distant evolutionarily from mammals can reveal additional visual mechanism or basic principles, expanding insight on brain function.